Synthesis Technology – E370 & more!

The Kickstarter for this ends THIS SUNDAY the 19th of March. Head to www.synthtech.com to check out the module and head to the campaign to bag yourself one. You’ll have very little chance of getting the module again after this Kickstarter has run it’s course.

Back in April 2012 Paul T Schreiber of Synthesis Technology teased a first look at a prototype/concept that was the E370 Quad Morphing VCO. Fast forward to today and the E370 has absolutely smashed it’s Kickstarter campaign currently at $168,462 (it’s gone up another $1000ish while typing) of funding with the initial project only asking for $58,000.

The module took a while to come to life and was originally proposed in this thread – Muff Wiggler link. There was a lot of discussion about features, panel layouts etc but it was held back to focus on cheaper modules. There’s also newer and faster DSP now giving us loads of features – it’s nuts!

The E370 is 4 Morphing VCOs that have all the functionally as the previous Synthesis Technology oscillators notably the E340 Cloud Generator and E350 Morphing Terrarium. So let’s check those out to see what you’re getting and where these concepts came from.

The E340 has a switchable density of 2, 4, or 8 oscillators that can be spread (detuned) to create a ‘cloud’ of sines or saws. Most are familiar with a big swarm of supersaws but a thick cloud of sines is a beautiful thing too! It featured (at the time) controls not seen before which were chaos and chaos bandwidth which animate and ‘wiggle’ the detuning and the bandwidth controls the speed of that. As you can imagine it’s easy to get a thick animated swarm or cloud for basslines, FX or pads.

It’s hard to know where to start with the E350 as I still feel a bit dumbstruck in my own little honeymoon period with it (I’ve had it for years now) as it’s the smoothest of the smooth morphing wavetables I’ve ever heard. It’s a dual output wavetable oscillator that has 3 banks of 64 waveforms that smoothly and glitch free morph between each other as the algorithm used calculates 128 “in-between” waveforms. In reality it’s like having over 24,000 individual timbres with all the morphing between them all. So exploration can be pretty endless. The first output has an XY output that offers a chess board like set of rows and columns to morph through. The second output is the Z output which moves through the rows on a single axis allowing you to have two different sounds and independent morphing over the X, Y and Z positions. It’s also (as Paul says HERE) the “worlds best LFO” as a 3 way range switch can take it down to 13 minutes per cycle with all the added waveform morphing and hard sync options. Finally there’s a quadrature mode (accessed by a jumper on the back) that moves the XY and Z outputs to be out of phase with each other (phase is modulated on the Z parameter). Features aside … rest assured it’s ace as an audible VCO or LFO. For added “proof” beyond my ramblings check out this video I did on the E350 and E355 (dual LFO variant of the E350) for Future Music magazine HERE.

With those features from the E340 and E350 in mind, imagine how good it would be to have clouds but with morphing wavetables … the E370 does that! There’s also attenuators for the CV inputs (crucially missing from the original modules that ooze loveliness with attenuated modulation) and thanks to passing many “stretch goals” in the campaign it now has 4 voice chord mode for any or all of the 4 oscillators, linear FM and if the final stretch goal is met it will also have TZFM (thru-zero FM).

Some history and information behind us at this point I should repeat … go grab an E370 on Kickstarter before you loose the chance to get one in the future! Click HERE.

While we’re deep into a long form post let’s explore some other Synthesis Technology modules. There’s the E950 Circuit Bent VCO. It uses licensed technology from the original Texas Instruments LPC speech synthesizers (such as the speak and spell). It contains original ROMs with additional banks of wavetables from the E350 for a “low cost morphing VCO”. The module can be used in both normal and circuit bent modes and all under voltage control that are repeatable and controllable unlike some temperamental and unreliable circuit bent glitch machines some of you may have used.

Coming off the back of the E950 is the E951 expander. This is an add on that expands the functions with an OLED display showing the full list of words and phrases in the speech banks, it also allows for short and long vocal snippets to be looped and played. THIS video from John L Rice shows the functions of the expander nicely. Check it out HERE. Some of you more avid modular users and Synthesis Tech fans may have seen the “Logan’s fault” panel for the expander that Paul had a while back, but since then there’s the killer (small run joke but fun none the less) Magpie panel with Logan from Low-Gain Electronics face on it. This panel combines the E950 and E951 in one panel.

I thought I’d grab a quote from Logan about why the expander is “his fault” so here’s a quote from him directly.

The 951 Expansion came to be when Paul mentioned to me he was working on an official circuit bent speak&spell VCO module. Since I have a long running history with circuit bending, and being the over opinionated asshole that I am, you can imagine I was very adamant about what feature sets were going to be made available. Since I was the “young buck” who had actually circuit bent a speak&spell or two (or 20…40) in his day.  We hashed out ideas. I sent him a video showing the functionality of the short and long looping. The nature of how you could get it so slow, it would turn into a random burst generator.  Which unfortunately didn’t make it to the design since he didn’t want to have a “reset” push button feature because it would actually cause the processor to crash just like the original.  So Paul was kind enough to take my thoughts into consideration and include them in an expansion header on the back of the E950… as for the MagPie Logan’s fault panel, that came to be I think because in the prototype stages of the E951, Paul made panels with “Logans Fault Edition” across the top of the module. He had them at Knobcon to show the module off and a friend who was displaying in the same room some how got the idea to ask MagPie (Kris) to do a panel with my face on it to be funny. Well the joke turned into a legit panel that combined the two modules into one panel with a picture of my face looking rather strange. Kris was kind enough to send me a royalty payment of a free panel so I can officially look like an ego maniac with a picture of myself in my rack. *laughs*

I should note you can check out Low-Gain Electronics modules by clicking HERE.

Finally let’s check out the E330 multimode VCO. This (like the E950/E951) is part of Paul’s focus prior to the E370 to make some cheaper modules. This VCO gives you some morphing wavetables, cloud mode and 2 operator FM. So it’s a great way to get a wide range of tones and some Synthesis Technology quality into your system.

If you’ve read this far you deserve a medal, comment with the words “DivKid loves Synth Tech” and I’ll send you some stickers (limited potentially if I have highly underestimated peoples commitment to reading these posts) EDIT – no more free stickers. Gotta get in their quicker than I anticipated. For those wanting some watch out for more chances in the future.

 

Surachai – Temple of the Weakening Sun

This is taken from the very comprehensive post on TRASH_AUDIO.

At the link above Surachai takes you through the pre-production, production, post production and release of the video that accompanies his music. It’s in depth and well worth a read. Just like his post about his album ‘Instinct and Memory’ and the extensive notes on the production which you can find HERE.

In this video we hear beating and clicking synths, extreme compression abuse, thick warm washes from deep sequences all alongside harmonic washes, rises and falls. Hit play below and check out the posts linked above.

DivKid 2016 Rundown

Inspired by Justin from Abstract Data‘s Facebook 2016 run down month by month (and the others that followed suit) I wanted to round up the year month by month as to what went on. Partly just to look back over the amount of videos that went on and also to show you lot that list too as there’s probably some that were missed. Prepare for a big list of links, here goes!

January 2016

The year kicked off with the Mystic Circuits Vert video and I had an SH-101 for a few weeks on loan to play around with. For those interested I prefer the SH-09. I can’t remember what else went on to be honest, like most probably an uneventful first month of the year.

February 2016

I remember spending loads of time mulling over the details of all the things announced at NAMM in January it took a while. Modular Podcast also launched this month with Greg and Matthew joining me for the first show, it feels like ages ago now … probably because I’m bored of their company at this point 🙂 . I also made a video for the Flame FX6 as I wanted to do it and reach out to the company but never managed to get any response from them. I find it odd how they’re completely off the radar yet have good modules. I also got round to the first performance video from Ross Lamond’s Bells N Whistles Crackles N Pops from November 2015. I’m always behind with event videos but I capture things when I can then get to editing in-between work.

March 2016

March March March sweet lordy March … I’ve no idea what happened in March 2016 to be honest. Nothing too eventful and prep for Superbooth following in April. Plenty of videos though, so (just for you Scanner) LET’S GET STUCK IN!

April 2016

Superbooth! I was a real come down after Superbooth but along with Matthew Shaw we got loads of footage as Modular Podcast. It was also my birthday this month both DivKid’s (stupid character has a back story don’t you know) made up birthday and my own.

 

 

 

 

Module Of The Month – January 2017

For issue 16 of DivKid’s Month Of Modular I picked out the Performance Mixer from WMD as my module of the month. It’s in pretty much every patch I make at the minute and will be fully overviewed in the usual DivKid video style in the near future.

DivKid’s Month Of Modular – Issue #16

Here’s issue 16 of DivKid’s Month Of Modular, magazine /e-zine whatever you want to call it … Module of the month was from WMD with their Performance Mixer, news was NAMM heavy with Catalyst Audio, Malekko, birdkids, Verbos, Intellijel and plenty more. I also interviewed deStrict to round of the features.

MAGAZINE – https://joom.ag/zF1W PDF – http://www.bit.ly/DivKidMag16

TipTop Audio – One

 

EDIT – Pricing has been announced at $175 and there’s now a video embedded below.

TipTop Audio have teased us for a while now about One, people seemed to start guessing it was a sample player as that fleshes out the TipTop system nicely and also offers a range of potential drum sounds their 808 and 909 analogue clones can’t offer. Well the predictions were right as One is a sample player. It’s only 4HP, high quality (up to 96kHz sample rate, great for pitching things down and retaining quality) with basic controls and CV / gate inputs. The module takes micro SD cards and there’s 6 SD cards with content designed by GLITCHMACHINES which we’ll get into below. The blurb from the website is copied below that too.

Getting into the cards we start with ‘VCTRS: Lets Get Started’. This is a mixed material one shot library with 60 sounds across 5 banks. This introduces the most compelling material from each card to demonstrate the strength of the module. KERNL is another one shot set of sounds which are percussive and textural in natural that’s labelled ‘Binary Manipulated Percussive Impacts’. BENT is (you’ve guessed it…) Circuit Bent sounds again percussive and this time digital. It’s made up of 256 sounds harvested from a variety of customised circuit bent machines. HYBRID again is percussion with 256 foley and field recording sounds. SBSTRT is called ‘Natural Percussive Elements’ agains both percussive and textural with 256 raw, natural earth sounds made by manipulating materials such as metal, stone, ice, plastic, vegetables etc. Finally PERC is again percussive but this time they are multi layered drum hits and percussive hits with tight attacked and bright harmonic content coming from a variety of sources.

It all sounds very good to me and the GLITCHMACHINES sounds I’m sure will deliver the goods!

ONE brings organic sound and super low latency sample playback to the modular. It differs from other sample players in that it handles the digital audio bits as a continuously manipulated electrical flow, a feature inspired by our analog knowhow. This unique core makes ONE truly integral within the Tiptop percussive modular ecosystem thanks to a lightweight and responsive digital circuit with a very analog feel.

ONE brings a world of colors to the modular right out of the package. We have invited some of the best sound designers in the Industry to create professional sound libraries with content tailored to the unique sonic framework of the modular synthesizer and that fully takes advantage of ONE’s unique qualities. To start with, ONE comes with a SD card loaded with a free set of 60 sounds designed by Glitchmachines. More cards are available to purchase separately each containing carefully selected material with up to 256 sound files. Using your own sample libraries or recordings is easy too, just copy 16 or 24bit mono WAV files onto the SD card, pop the card into ONE and go.

ONE offers several modes of operation, with the primary being the super low latency Trigger mode that retrieves audio data off the SD card adding no artificial processing such as click removal, crossfading, eq or gain normalization. In this mode, it’s a highly transparent player up to 24 bit 96kHz with no interpolation of the audio data: what you put in is what you get out. With a delay as low as 0.25ms from the moment the trigger hits, ONE offers harmonically dense, clear and detailed audio with a great rhythmic feel.

ONE handles external CV through a user selectable multifunction jack. Pitch is the main control with two modes available: Free pitch allows for fine tuning of the playback rate, great for adding subtle vibrato or wild tape speed effects; Quantized pitch maps CV to the standard 12 tone system over 3.5 octaves and is ideal for melodic content. CV can also be used to sequence through files off the SD card allowing far more varied sounds from a single source; almost like an entire percussion section behind the slim panel.

Although originally designed to play tightly with our analog drums and envelopes, ONE’s rich sound quality encouraged us to make it work in a variety of other applications that are less demanding of sub millisecond timing response. The extra headroom at the core level allows features such as Gated playback, Looping, and Triggering with fades in and out to accommodate different types of sound sources from drum loops to polysynth chords to noise sources and other yet unimagined uses.

ONE offers another useful dimension since it can play CV signals too. Drop in a card with LFO signals, random CV, slopes and envelopes for a whole set of new control and modulation possibilities.

ONE is as simple to use as it is affordable and plays extremely well with it’s analog cousins – our vision for bringing samples into the modular world.

 

Steady State Fate – Entity

Oh Andrew Morelli …. Mr SSF … What a killer drum modules you’ve made! 🙂 Calling Entity a Bass Drum Synthesizer is a bit misleading but it certainly makes for a cool kick drum. I wanted to make a post to share the vast tones in the videos direct from SSF for the module.

I’ve just finished up a series of work for Future Music magazine (two pages in the magazine as an article and tutorial and video to accompany it) based around the Entity and drum synthesis and alongside that I used the Gatestorm from Erogenous Tones & SSF (collab module).

So here’s the videos from SSF’s YouTube page and watch out for my coverage surfacing in the coming months. Cheers!

Verbos Bark Filter at NAMM 2017 & Unusual frequency scaling

Already announced before NAMM (but the video below) is from NAMM 2017 here’s the Bark Filter from Verbos Electronics. It’s named the Bark Filter due to the scaling of the frequency bands used which come from the Bark scale. I’m sure (as with every other Verbos module I’ve used) that this will be killer and you can hear it in the Analogue Zone video below but I wanted to delve into the Bark Scale and using non standard spacings for filter banks and EQs.

I first came across an unusual (or rather uncommon) frequency spacing in the Serge Resonant EQ. Without having an original I jumped at the chance to get one in eurorack format from Low-Gain, Clark and Manhattan Analog with the module pictured to the left. It’s frequency aren’t split like a  normal EQ that may have the bands 55Hz, 110Hz, 220Hz, 440Hz, 880Hz and so on. The reason in the case of the Serge EQ is that normal EQs reinforce a musical scale or key. In the numbers listed above those frequencies are all the note A with the frequencies split at octaves all reinforcing the same scale or note. There’s some great blurb for the Serge EQ on the Thonk store page for the DIY kit (not available at the minute) … erm … that page isn’t around anymore and I can’t find it. Which is gutting as it was a good read about the scale. But you do get the idea from the random*source Res EQ module blurb quoted below.

Except for the top and bottom frequency bands, the bands are spaced at an interval of a major seventh. The Resonant Equalizer is designed to produce formant peaks and valleys similar to those in acoustic insstruments.

Until the Verbos module came to life I’d not heard of the Bark scale so doing some digging (god I love the learning that the modular world continues to invite you delve into) and here’s a summary. The Bark Scale was first proposed in 1961 by Eberhard Zwicker (not a Mr. Bark as you may think) however it is named the Bark scale as it was named after Heinrich Barkhausen who proposed the first subjective loudness measurements. Above 500Hz the scale is very similar to a logarithmic curve but below and increasingly becomes more and more linear. The scale has 24 bands that correspond to the 24 critical bands of hearing. The idea of these critical bands was introduced to audiology and psychoacoustics by Harvey Fletcher  invention of the in 1933 before it was refined in 1940. Interestingly Harvey Fletcher is known as the father of stereophonic sound and credited with an early electronic hearing aid and alongside Wilden A. Munson they determined the Fletcher-Munson curves … which is something I imagine some of you have heard of. But back to the critical bands … The critical bands describe the frequency bandwidth of the “auditory filter” created by the cochlea which is an organ within the inner ear. Each of the 24 critical bands has a varying bandwidth but a rounded version (so the quote below to see why these are rounded) of the center frequencies is as follows. 60Hz, 150Hz, 250Hz, 350Hz, 450Hz, 570Hz, 700Hz, 840Hz, 1000Hz, 1170Hz,1370Hz, 1600Hz, 1850Hz, 2150Hz, 2500Hz, 2900Hz, 3400Hz, 4000Hz, 4800Hz, 5800Hz, 7000Hz, 8500Hz, 10500Hz and 13500Hz.

In his letter “Subdivision of the Audible Frequency Range into Critical Bands”, Zwicker states:

“These bands have been directly measured in experiments on the threshold for complex sounds, on masking, on the perception of phase, and most often on the loudness of complex sounds. In all these phenomena, the critical band seems to play an important role. It must be pointed out that the measurements taken so far indicate that the critical bands have a certain width, but that their position on the frequency scale is not fixed; rather, the position can be changed continuously, perhaps by the ear itself.”

Thus the important attribute of the Bark scale is the width of the critical band at any given frequency, not the exact values of the edges or centers of any band.

The Verbos Bark Filter doesn’t work with varying the bandwidth but uses the idea of these rounded/approximated center frequencies to form the 12 band fixed filter that the module is. The filters used here are steep 6th order band pass filters and you get a huge range of control and data out of the module. Bands are split into even and odd where you can take in one signal and split the output into the odd and even bands or you can even use two different inputs into the odd and even bands. There’s an envelope follower per band (awesome for extracted CV data out of dynamic and broad band sources such as a drum kit or even a full patch) and also a CV over each band. You can control the decay of the envelope followers and also shift and tilt the EQ in the same way as you can control the first 8 harmonics on the Verbos Harmonic Oscillator. As I said above every bit of Verbos kit I’ve touched is awesome, super high build quality and amazing sound quality. One trick mentioned by Mark Verbos and also brought up regarding the 4ms SMR (although that’s only 6 bands in total, but a very different module I should add) is that you can do basic vocoding with the module. A vocoder is simply an analysis system for extracting information and a processor for applying that to something else. So using the odd input as analyzers you can then use the envelope follower outputs to control the amplitude through the CV inputs of the even bands. There’s even switching to do this on the module which will save a mound of cable spaghetti. I’m excited to check out the module in person hopefully sometime soon and also to see Mark Verbos again at Superbooth in April. It was great to meet him and chat about ideas and his work in person and even better to get him on the Modular Podcast show to talk about origins and applications of Random which I’ve linked below too.

I should add that quotes are from Wikipedia and are all linked through. Like most my digging involved google, Wikipedia, clicking on and checking sources etc. I hope that inspires some digging and a bit of your own research too. 

Oberheim at NAMM 2017

Sonic State and Tom Oberheim … nice combo for a trade show right there. Head to the video below to check out Nick Batt talking to Tom Oberheim with a little history lesson and walk through of the projects. Features aren’t discussed at length so I’ll dive into those myself below. Above is an image of the first Ring Modulator available aimed at performing musicians in 1970. Tom brought this along to NAMM and there’s also his phase shifter (that I believe went on to be a Maestro product) that was made in 1971. Both of those are now going to be available in adapted form in the eurorack format along his new synth modules.

You can see both the Phase Shifter and the Ring Modulator in the image above and both look to be fully featured, however a little big (hides under chair for my criticism). It’s interesting to see an effect in and out switch rather than a single on off button or switch. I wonder if there’s an advantage to doing it that way, or just something to follow the original designs. You have 3 speed buttons for low, medium or high frequency phase shifting along with an external modulation input, speed CV input and direct out. The direct out I think might be the internal LFO modulation. There’s then the obvious input and output. The Ring Modulator again has the in and out effect switch and low medium and high ranges. There’s knobs for input (input level no doubt), frequency and depth along with small trim knobs for the X and Y. The bottom input section gives us a big hint into how the unit works. There’s an external carrier input which hints at an internal one. That would also make sense for the carrier output and 1v/oct input. So there’s an internal oscillator to be used as a carried which you can also control the pitch of with your usual sources. There’s then a input (for the modulator I imagine) and an output. Both modules are “exactly the same circuit for 1970 and 1971”.

The new synth voice SEM-X is current development of the SEM+ (they didn’t like the name) that Oberheim had showed at a previous NAMM show. In the picture you can see the SEM-X modules and their Patch Panels. Each SEM-X module is going to come with a Patch Panel but you can re arrange these in the layout above for ease of patching. Each SEM-X is an Oberheim voice with two VCOs, a multimode VCF, two envelope generators, one LFO and a small mod section.

According to Tom in the video these products will be available in a few months “probably in May”.

 

10 new intellijel modules at NAMM 2017

UPDATE – I’ve now replaced all the photos with HQ web images direct from Intellijel. Be sure to click on them for full resolution images.

intellijel dropped 10 new modules at NAMM was that more or less than Erica Synths when they announced the PICO range? Anyway, they’ve been busy so let’s get stuck in!

Regarding Intellijel, by far the most exciting module for most will be Plonk (good name, I like!) Which is a new collaboration module from both intellijel and Applied Acoustic Systems A|A|S. If you’ve not heard of Tassman or Chromaphone from A|A|S you’ve probably seen their work in Ableton Live. They developed Analog, Tension, Collision and Electric for the DAW which are all great devices. You didn’t come here for DAW devices though so … Plonk brings in that software technology from A|A|S and that’s in the new module Plonk. It’s a physical modelling module suited to percussive sounds through modal synthesis. With beams, plates, membranes and strings there’s a wide range of objects to excite in various ways. Modal synthesis works with an exciter and a resonator first seen in the eurorack world with Elements from Mutable Instruments. Rather than choosing to build a large module with all the controls on the front Plonk offers macro control and a crisp and clear OLED screen to show / change settings and modulation. As we’ve seen with Rings from Mutable Instruments Plonk offers polyphony in the way of overlapping notes, meaning that as one sound decays you can strike and create another and the original sound won’t cut off. Fast forward to 15:18 in my Rings video to check this polyphonic feature out. Plonk runs at 24bit and 44.1kHz so no concerns with quality.

Next up is the Tetrapad which is a four part custom touch and pressure controller with various modes. The pressure is true ‘force sensing resistor’ pressure and not capacitance based. Meaning you can press the pads/strips harder with any object to get the pressure output. There’s a basic level and pressure mode with gives a value from the vertical position of the pads as well as a pressure output along with various other modes than can create strumming like gestures, 4 different pitch intervals for chord generation and there’s an expander coming that will allow you to sequence between those too. It looks like it will fit in nicely among the likes of Pressure Points and the new Twisted Elektron keyboard controller, likes those two modules Tetrapad will also be able to link with a second module for extended functionality.

Third in line is a new Quad VCA with adjustable response like the uVCA, cascading mixing, normalling between channels (that can be broken), amplification (see the boost switch) and everything you’d want from a bunch of VCAs. There’s a few quad VCAs around now included Mutable Instruments Veils, ALM’s Tangle Quartet, Bubblesounds VCA4p and no doubt a few more. Super handy modules well worth considering for plenty of extra control over your modulation and audio control. It’s third in the series of multiple VCA modules (is there a collective name for a group of multiple VCAs? Like a gaggle of geese for example) from intellijel after the original HexVCA and Linix. Fun fact – I just grabbed a second hand HexVCA (they’re long out of production) and it’s great. I also use the uVCA a lot so I’m sure this will be just as good.

Module four (no particular order I should say) is the Shifty. Which is a sequential switch and shift register where you can either sample the inputs or have them track or sample. You can randomise or ping pong the play through or have outputs cascade across each other for the shift register mode. Shifty looks as if it will bring together multiple modules in a compact unit to control and modulate through multiple voices and or sequences. You’d need sample and holds, a shift register, switch etc to put similar patches together, so it makes this look very immediate. There’s manual buttons for step through and reset and four gate and CV outputs from the one gate and CV input. That makes this a one way system (surely for the processing involved) unlike more basic switches that can go from 4 inputs to 1 output or 1 input to 4 outputs.

The fifth new module is actually a remake of the Springray module. It was previous a voltage driven spring reverb circuit that limited frequency response. So that has been updated to a whole new circuit that is current driven for a better response. There’s also a fully parametric EQ instead of the tilting EQ that was on the previous version. Patching in an LFO to the EQ frequency with a high gain reduction would give a phaser like sound over the spring reverb due to the notch EQ moving frequency – nice! There’s still a limiter circuit which is optical (like opto compression or vactrols) to stop your feedback getting out of hand. I can’t find a picture or get a good cut from videos of the new Springray so you’ll have to compare the video below to the image used here.

The next 5 modules are all 1U tiles and the first is a basic line input with level control. Simple but useful. The picture above in the new clock generator, noise generator, probability based random gate, sample and hold / track and hold and slew generator … that’s a lot crammed in and a mouthful, or finger full as I’m typing. There’s also a buffered mutliple which albeit plain is a good use of the space saving the precious 3U ‘normal’ rows for other duties. There’s also a “high quality” headphone driver that’s stereo in and 1/4″ stereo jack out with level control. Finally there’s a digital reverb that comes from Accutronics which I imagine is a similar digital brick to the one that’s compatible with the Music Thing Modular Spring Reverb module. There’s also new sizes in the case range and a carry bag for the cases. So lots of action in the intellijel camp!